Monthly Archives: October 2018

Spiral Seasoned Potatoes

Spiral Seasoned Potatoes

 

Using a spiralizer, potatoes are cut into stringy fries and then seasoned before being baked in the oven to crispy perfection.

 

Spiral Seasoned Potatoes

Ingredients                                                                    Makes: 3 servings
3 large potatoes
1 1/2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 tsp onion powder
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/4 tsp paprika
1/4 tsp sea salt
pinch black pepper

Instructions
Preheat oven and prepare tray. Move the rack close to the top of the oven and then preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line a large oven tray with parchment paper to prevent sticking and burning. If doubling the recipe, line two large oven trays to ensure crispiness.

Spiralize the potatoes. Clean the potatoes and cut out any eyes and sore spots. Using a spiralizer, attach the large noodle attachment. Spiralize the potatoes and then transfer to a large wide bowl with a fitting lid.

Season the potatoes. Drizzle the olive oil over the top of the potatoes evenly. Sprinkle the seasonings over the potatoes evenly, which include the onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, sea salt and black pepper. Apply the lid to the bowl and then gently toss the potatoes until evenly coated with the seasoning.

Bake the potatoes. Transfer the seasoned spiral potatoes to the tray(s) lined with the parchment paper. Evenly spread out the potatoes, the more spread out the crispier they will be. Place the potato in the oven and let bake for 25 to 30 minutes.

Remove any burnt pieces as there may be a few, the seasoned spiral potatoes should otherwise be cooked through, soft and crispy. Let cool for a few minutes before serving. Enjoy!

Recipe shared by: J. Marshall

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Sun-Dried Tomato-Basil Pesto Penne

 

Sun-dried tomatoes preserved in olive oil, a bunch of fresh basil and minced garlic create a mouth-watering pesto in this flavourful pasta dish. Best of all it is a simple recipe that can be made in just 30 minutes!

Sun-Dried Tomato-Basil Pesto Penne

Ingredients                                                                            Makes: 4 servings
3 cups (12oz) penne pasta, dried
4 sun-dried tomatoes    *see recipe below !!
2 Tbsp of the sun-dried tomato infused olive oil  (that the tomatoes were packed in)
3 garlic cloves, peeled
1 cup fresh basil leaves
1/3 cup Parmesan, freshly grated ~or~ Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, freshly grated
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
pinch sea salt  (or to taste)
pinch of ground black pepper  (or to taste)

Instructions
Prepare the pesto. Blend the sun-dried tomatoes and their infused-oil, garlic, sea salt and pepper and basil in a food processor and blend until the tomatoes are finely chopped. Then stir in the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Transfer the tomato-herb oil mixture to a large bowl. Stir in the grated Parmesan.

Prepare pasta. Cook the pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water until tender but still firm to the bite, stirring occasionally, about 8 minutes or according to package instructions. Remove from heat source and drain the water.

Toss the pasta with the pesto-infused oil. Add the hot drained pasta to the pesto-infused oil and toss to coat. Season the pasta with salt and pepper to suit taste and serve immediately.

Recipe shared by: J. Marshall

*Try our Sun-Dried Tomatoes in Olive Oil recipe here!

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Sun-Dried Tomatoes in Olive Oil

Tomatoes are dehydrated in an oven or in a dehydrator, then preserved in olive oil. The olive oil becomes infused with the rich flavour of the dehydrated tomatoes which can be used in future recipes along with the “sun-dried” tomatoes.

Sun-Dried Tomatoes in Olive Oil

Ingredients                                                                                 Makes: 1/2 pint jar
8 (1lb) Roma tomatoes ~or~ other small tomato variety
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil + more as needed
1/4 cup red wine vinegar ~or~ white vinegar (for dipping)
1/5 tsp sea salt

Instructions
Clean and prepare tomatoes. Wash the tomatoes, cut out the stems and then cut them in half lengthwise. Remove as many of the seeds as possible without removing the pulp. With the cut side facing upward, lightly sprinkle the sea salt over the tomatoes evenly.

Dehydrate the tomatoes by oven or dehydrator. Oven-drying method (approximately 10 hours). Preheat an oven to 170°F and set the racks to the middle of the oven. If you are making a small batch and have a toaster oven, use that as it will cost less in energy.

Line baking sheets with parchment paper and then arrange the seasoned tomatoes, with the cut surface up. Glass or porcelain dishes are fine, as is non-stick cookie sheets. Avoid using aluminum foil or laying the tomatoes directly onto aluminum baking sheets as the acid in the tomato will react with the metal. Lining the trays with parchment paper will ensure the tomatoes will not stick and will be less likely to burn or react.

Bake the halved and lightly salted tomatoes in the oven for about 3 hours. If moisture builds up, prop open the oven door an inch or so to let out moisture. After 3 hours, turn the tomatoes over and press flat with a spatula. Continue to cook the tomatoes, turning the tomatoes over again after a couple hours if needed and gently pressing flatter until the tomatoes are dry. The tomatoes should be dehydrated after 10 to 14 hours of cooking, depending on how big and meaty the tomatoes are that are being used.

When the tomatoes are ready they should feel leathery, slightly gummy. There should be no more moisture felt when they are squeezed with the fingers. The tomatoes should not be crisp or burnt either; over-cooked tomatoes cannot be rehydrated. Place the dehydrated tomatoes on a rack to cool, covered with a clean cloth.

Please note that the tomatoes will become ready at different times as some may be smaller of less meaty then others, so check if they are ready near the end of the cooking time, and remove dehydrated tomatoes when they are done.

Dehydrator-drying method (approximately 8 hours). Place the tomatoes, cut side up, directly onto the dehydrator trays; otherwise the cut side sticks to the tray, making them harder to turn later. Set the dehydrator temperature to about 150°F, and begin cooking the tomatoes.

After about 4 hours, turn the tomatoes over and press flat with a spatula, repeat after a few more hours. Continue drying the tomatoes until they are done, removing finished ones as they become ready. Allow the dehydrated tomatoes to cool in a bowl at room-temperature until they are all ready.

Sterilize the jar. While the tomatoes are cooking, give the preserving jar and lid a water-bath to sterilize them. In a sauce-pot insert the preserving jar and caps and then fill the pot with water to 2 inches above the jar. Place the sauce-pot on the heat and let it boil for about 10 minutes. Lay out a clean dish towel for the jar and lids to dry on. When the jar are sterilized and ready, using jar and lid lifters, transfer them to the towel with the jar placed upside-down.

Preserving the dehydrated tomatoes in oil. Dry the jar with a clean dish towel if needed to make them ready for the tomatoes. Press out any air that may be trapped in the dehydrated tomatoes, now also room-temperature cooled. In a small bowl pour in 1/4 cup of the vinegar. Dip the tomatoes one at a time in the vinegar, fully submerging it and allowing them to soak for a full minute; before transferring the tomatoes to the sterile jar. The vinegar with sharpen the flavour of the tomato as well acidify the oil and will discourage bacteria and mold growth.

When the jar is full of the vinegar dipped tomatoes, cover them with a high-quality extra-virgin olive oil. Ensure that the tomatoes are fully covered in oil, adding more as needed. Refrigerate the jar to prevent spoilage as it will spoil quicker left out at room temperature. The oil will solidify in the refrigerator, but will liquify again quickly at room temperature.

The dehydrated (sun-dried) tomatoes, as well the flavour-infused oil, can be used separately in recipes as desired. If using the oil, be sure to replenish the jar so that the tomatoes are always full covered.

The dehydrated tomatoes in olive oil will keep for up to 3 months in a refrigerator without spoilage. Enjoy!

Recipe shared by: J. Marshall

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Pickled Peppers

Pickled Peppers

An excellent way to preserve extra (hot or sweet) peppers from the garden is by pickling them! Pickled peppers can be stored in a refrigerator for a couple of months, or they can be made shelf-stable by water-processing the jars for up to a year; the choice is yours.

Pickled Peppers

Ingredients                                                                       Makes: 4 pints
6 cups hot and/or sweet peppers, chopped
4 garlic cloves
3 cups apple cider vinegar ~or~ white vinegar
1 cup purified water
4 tsp pickling salt ~or~ kosher salt
4 tsp organic sugar

Instructions
Sterilize jars and prepare canning equipment. Sterilize jars by boiling them with the lids removed in a large stockpot for a couple of minutes; only necessary if jars have been used for other canning purposes. If the jars are relatively clean, a soap and water bath is good enough. Ensure that the seal on the lids are not damaged in any way, otherwise replace.

Take out the stockpot or canner, the canning wrack, jar lifter and any other tools you will require when getting ready to can.

Make the brine. In a medium sauce-pot add the vinegar, water, salt and sugar. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring until salt and sugar is dissolved; then remove from heat and allow the brine to cool.

Prepare the peppers. It is a good idea to wear rubber gloves when handling hot peppers to avoid the hot pepper oil from stinging your hands and anything you touch for hours later; and be sure to keep your hands away from your face.

Wash the peppers and the cut off the stem ends. Slice the peppers into rings that are 1/4 to a 1/2-inch thick. Peppers can also be cut into chunks or 1/4-inch strips, what ever your preference is.

Fill the jars. In each jar add 1 garlic clove cut in half and then pack with the sliced peppers as tight as possible without damaging or crushing the peppers. Ladle the cooled vinegar mixture into the jars using the funnel, leaving 1/4-inch headspace at the top. Remove any bubbles by gently moving the contents of the jar with a chopstick or similar utensil; then refill jars with additional liquid, if necessary. Clean jar rims with wet paper towel. Add lids and screw on rings just until finger tight, not too tight.

For refrigerator pickled peppers. Place jars in refrigerator and allow to marinate for at least 1 week for the best flavour. They will be good for up to 2 months.

Process the jars for longer shelf storage in the water bath. Fill the canner or stockpot to about 2/3 full of warm water, but not too hot. Transfer the filled jars to the canner into the rack using the jar lifter. Ensure the jars are covered by 1 to 2-inches of water, then bring water to a boil. When water reaches a rolling boil, reduce the heat to medium-high to a gentle boil.

Process the jars in the water bath for 10 minutes for elevations up to 1000 ft, for elevations 1,001 to 6,000 feet, process for an additional 5 minutes; and another 5 minutes to the processing time again above 6,000ft. After the jars have finished processing, turn off the heat and allow the jars to rest in the hot water bath for at least 10 minutes before removing. (Introducing jars from cold to hot and hot to cold environments could cause the jars to break).

Line a clean dish towels on a counter to transfer the jars to when they are done processing in the water-bath. Carefully remove the jars with a jar lifter without tilting or shaking to the towel to be left undisturbed for 24 hours. Do not re-tighten the lids if they have become loose as you could break the seal. As the jars cool you should hear a “popping sound” telling you that your jars are sealing.

Cool jars undisturbed. Allow the jars to cool upright completely undisturbed for 24 hours to guarantee success. Check the jars have sealed properly by pressing down on the middle of the lid, if it pops back, it is not sealed. The disc on top should be curved downward and not move when pressed if properly sealed.

Label the jars including the date they were made. Store the sealed jars in a cool dark place like a pantry, cellar or cold-storage room. Canned peppers should be used within the year, once opened they should be refrigerated and will keep well for up to 6 months. If the jars did not seal properly, just put the jars in the fridge and use within a month.

Recipe shared by: J. Marshall

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Beet Pickled Turnips

Beet Pickled Turnip

A Middle Eastern fermented turnip recipe that adds beets for colour. This is not a canning recipe, instead these turnips should be stored in the fridge after the fermentation process. Pickled Turnip are a tasty side-dish and great on sandwiches!

Beet Pickled Turnips

Ingredients                                                                    Makes: 1 pint
2 to 3 small fresh turnips, cut in 1/2-inch spears
1 small red beet, cut in 1/2-inch spears
1/2 hot pepper, sliced in rings
1 garlic clove, cut in half
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar ~or~ white vinegar
1/2 cup purified water
1 bay leaf
1/3 tsp coriander seeds (optional)
1 Tbsp pickling salt or kosher salt

Instructions
Sterilize jar(s). Sterilize the jars and lids in a large sauce-pot of boiling water. The water should cover the jars completely. Allow the jars to boil for 10 minutes before removing from heat. Use a jar lifter and a magnetic lid lifter to safely remove the jars and lids from the hot water. Transfer jars and lids to a clean towel to air dry. This process is important to ensure sterilized jars since they will not be processed in a water-bath and because of the fermentation process.

Make the brine. In a medium saucepan add the water, the vinegar and the spices which include the bay leaf and the coriander seeds. Bring the brine ingredients to a boil, then reduce to medium, cover and simmer for 10 minutes. Let cool completely.

Prepare the turnips and the beet. Trim the tops and the bottoms off the turnips and the beet and then peel using a vegetable peeler. Cut the turnips and the beet into 1/2-inch spears.

Prepare the garlic and the pepper. Peel the garlic and the cut in half. Cut half of a hot pepper into rings.

Fill the jars. In the bottom of the sterilized jar place the garlic clove and the pepper rings. Stuff the turnips and beet spears into the jar, packing them without damaging them. Then pour in the cooled brine, seeds and all, to fully cover the turnips and leaving 1/4 inch headspace from the rim of the jar.

Ferment. Let the pickled turnips sit in a relatively cool dark place for 5 days to enable the fermentation process. This process can be skipped entirely if desired and the turnips just put immediately in fridge to pickle.

Refrigerate. After allowing the turnip to ferment for five days, transfer to a refrigerator. Pickled turnip taste best cold and are ready to eat after marinating for 1 week. Pickled turnip will keep for about two months in the fridge. Enjoy!

Recipe shared by J. Marshall

*Try our Baked Falafel recipe and/or our Tzatziki Sauce recipe for the ingredients to make a falafel sandwich wrap!

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  • Article Archive – View our reference articles on maintaining a well-balanced diet, the nutritional value of essential nutrients, nutrient-rich foods and the beneficial foods that can help in the healing of chronic disease and illness.
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