Monthly Archives: May 2017

Fattoush Salad

Fattoush Salad

 

An Eastern-Mediterranean salad with romaine lettuce, tomatoes, cucumber, sweet peppers, fresh mixed herbs and crunchy pita chips tossed in a lightly seasoned lemon and olive oil dressing.

Fattoush Salad

Ingredients                              Makes: 6 servings
~Pita Chips~
2 to 3 large pita rounds, cut into 1 to 3-inch pieces
avocado oil ~or~ coconut oil for frying
dash of sea salt & black pepper
1/8 tsp cumin
~Salad~
2 cups romaine lettuce, chop into 1 to 2-inch pieces
1 to 2 tomatoes, chop into 1-inch pieces
1 cucumber, peeled and diced into 1/2 to 1-inch pieces
1 bell pepper, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
3 green onions, minced
1/2 cup fresh mint leaves, separated from stems
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
2 Tbsp fresh cilantro, chopped
~Dressing~
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup lemon juice ~or~ lime juice
2 tsp white wine vinegar or balsamic vinegar
1 tsp maple syrup
1 garlic clove, minced
couple pinches of sea salt ~or~ celery salt
couple pinches of black pepper

Instructions
Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add pita chip seasonings which include sea salt, black pepper and cumin. Place pita pieces into the skillet and toss until evenly coated. Fry in batches until browned; then remove to cool on a clean towel.

Clean and cut up the romaine lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, bell pepper, green onions, mint leaves, parsley, and cilantro and then transfer to a large bowl.

In a small bowl whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice, vinegar, maple syrup, minced garlic, salt and pepper.

Gently toss salad with fried pita pieces broken into 1 to 2-inch pieces and dressing; serve immediately.

Recipe shared by: J. Marshall

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The 40 Healthiest Foods to Add to the Menu

To maintain good health the body requires the right balance of essential nutrients best obtained through eating fresh whole foods. Nutrient-rich whole foods provide more vitamins and minerals per serving size than other foods.

Whole foods are unprocessed or very lightly processed natural foods like: plain unsweetened yogurt, whole-grain breads and pastas, brown and wild rice, beans, lentils, seeds, nuts, fruits and vegetables.

Whole food-based vitamins and powders are a great way to fulfill some of a person’s daily essential nutrient requirements. But only by maintaining a diet of whole foods and avoiding highly processed, sugary and fried foods can a person truly satisfy their dietary needs.

Through adding nutrient-rich whole foods to the menu on a regular basis, a person can better achieve fulfilling a well-balanced diet with a healthy dose of essential nutrients.

Following is a list of the 40 healthiest, nutrient-rich whole foods that cover all the essential nutrients a person requires daily in order to maintain good health. Eat good and live long.

40 Healthiest Nutrient-Rich Foods

These foods are in order by category such as fruits and vegetables, and not by nutritional potency. For each food item follows a list of their essential nutrients, trace elements and other unique healing qualities.

1.    Blueberries – are powerful antioxidants and an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin C, manganese, copper and dietary fiber.
2.    Lemons / Limes – are very alkalizing for the body which can assist in normalizing acidic PH levels, as well an excellent source for vitamin C, folate, flavonoids and antioxidants.
3.    Bananas – are an excellent source for vitamin B6, vitamin C, manganese, copper, potassium, biotin, magnesium, antioxidants and fiber.
4.    Avocados – are an excellent source of healthy fats, folate, vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin B5, vitamin B6, vitamin E, pantothenic acid, antioxidants and Potassium.
5.    Papaya –  is an excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin A, folate, magnesium, potassium, copper, pantothenic acid, antioxidants and dietary fiber. Papaya contains an enzyme called papain that aids in protein digestion.
6.    Pineapples – are an excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin B6, vitamin B1, manganese, copper, folate, pantothenic acid and dietary fiber. Pineapples also contain bromelain which is a unique protein-digesting enzyme only found in pineapples.
7.    Strawberries – are an excellent source for vitamin C, manganese, iodine, folate, copper, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, biotin, omega3, antioxidants, anthocyanins and dietary fiber.
8.    Raspberries – are an excellent source for vitamin C, vitamin K, Vitamin E, manganese, copper, biotin, magnesium, omega3, folate, potassium, flavonoids, antioxidants, pantothenic acid and fiber.
9.    Tomatoes – are an excellent source for vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin B6, vitamin B3, vitamin B1, vitamin E, biotin, molybdenum, potassium, copper, manganese, folate, phosphorus, magnesium and dietary fiber.
10.    Spinach – is an excellent source for vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, vitamin E, vitamin C, vitamin B1, vitamin B3, manganese, folate, magnesium, iron, copper, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, choline, omega3, selenium, chlorophyll, antioxidants, pantothenic acid, dietary fiber and protein.
11.    Mixed Dark Leafy Salad Greens – are an excellent source for vitamin k, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, vitamin C, folate, manganese, potassium, copper, biotin, omega3, iron, chlorophyll, antioxidants and fiber.
12.    Kale – is an excellent source for vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin B2, vitamin B1, manganese, copper, calcium, potassium, iron, magnesium, chlorophyll, antioxidants protein and dietary fiber.
13.    Parsley – is an excellent source for vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin E, folate, iron, copper, potassium, magnesium, calcium, chlorophyll, antioxidants and dietary fiber.
14.    Swiss Chard – is an excellent source for vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, vitamin B1, magnesium, copper, potassium, iron, choline, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, antioxidants, dietary fiber and protein.
15.    Cabbage – is an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin B6, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, manganese, potassium, copper, folate, choline, phosphorus, selenium, magnesium, iron, calcium, protein and dietary fiber.
16.    Broccoli – is an excellent source for vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin B6, vitamin E, vitamin B2, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B3, chromium, folate, phosphorus, manganese, choline, potassium, copper, omega3, magnesium, zinc, iron, calcium, selenium, sulforaphane, carotenoids, protein and dietary fiber.
17.    Watercress – is an excellent source for vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium manganese, potassium, antioxidants and chlorophyll.
18.    Asparagus – is an excellent source for vitamin K, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin B3, vitamin A, vitamin B6, folate, copper, selenium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, choline, zinc, iron magnesium, dietary fiber and protein.
19.    Carrots – are an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin B6, vitamin B3, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin E, biotin, potassium, manganese, copper, phosphorus, folate, carotenoids and dietary fiber.
20.    Bell Peppers – are an excellent source for vitamin C, vitamin B6, vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin B2, vitamin B2, vitamin K, folate, potassium, manganese, antioxidants and dietary fiber.
21.    Sweet Potatoes  – are an excellent source for vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B6, vitaminB3, Vitamin B1, vitamin B2, manganese, copper, biotin, potassium, phosphorus, antioxidants and dietary fiber.
22.    Beets – are an excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin B6, folate, manganese, potassium, copper, magnesium, phosphorus, nitrates and dietary fiber.
23.    Squash (pumpkin, spaghetti, butternut, ect.) – is an excellent source for vitaminC, vitamin B1, vitamin K, vitamin B6, vitamin B3, vitamin B2, copper, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, folate, zinc, omega3, calcium, pantothenic acid, iron, choline, fiber and protein.
24.    Brussels Sprouts – are an excellent source for vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin B6, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin A, vitamin B3, folate, manganese, choline, copper, potassium, phosphorus, omega 3, iron, magnesium, protein, calcium, zinc and dietary fiber.
25.    Onions – are an excellent source in vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin B1, manganese, copper phosphorus, potassium, folate, antioxidants and dietary fiber.
26.    Garlic – is an excellent source for vitamin B6, vitamin C, manganese, copper, selenium and antioxidants.
27.    Wheat Germ – is an excellent source for vitamin b6, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper, manganese, selenium and dietary fiber.
28.    Quinoa – is gluten-free and an excellent source of manganese, copper, phosphorus, magnesium, folate, zinc, antioxidants and dietary fiber.
29.    Oats  – are gluten-free and an excellent source of vitamin B1, manganese, molybdenum, phosphorus, copper, biotin, magnesium, chromium, zinc, beta-glucans, protein and dietary fiber.
30.    Plain Yogurt – is an excellent source of vitamin B12, vitamin B2, iodine, phosphorus, calcium, molybdenum, pantothenic acid, biotin, zinc and protein.
31.    Wild Salmon – is an excellent source for vitamin B12, vitamin D, vitamin B3, vitamin B6, selenium, omega 3, phosphorus, iodine, choline, pantothenic acid, biotin, potassium and protein.
32.    Sardines – are an excellent source for vitamin B12, vitamin D, vitamin B3, vitamin B2, selenium, phosphorus, omega3, calcium, iodine, copper, choline and protein.
33.    Eggs – are an excellent source for vitamin B12, vitamin B2, vitamin D, vitamin A, choline, selenium, biotin, molybdenum, iodine, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, and protein.
34.    Pumpkin Seeds – are an excellent source for manganese, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, zinc, iron and protein.
35.    Sunflower Seeds – are an excellent source for vitamin E, vitamin B1, vitamin B6, vitamin B3, copper, manganese, selenium, phosphorus, magnesium and folate.
36.    Almonds – are an excellent source for vitamin E, vitamin B2, biotin, manganese, copper, phosphorus, magnesium, molybdenum, healthy fats, antioxidants, protein and fiber.
37.    Chia Seeds – are an excellent source for manganese, phosphorus, calcium, zinc,  protein and dietary fiber.
38.    Flax Seed – is an excellent source for vitamin B1, omega3, copper, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium and fiber.
39.    Lentils – are an excellent source for vitamin B1, vitamin B6, molybdenum, folate, copper, phosphorus, manganese, iron, pantothenic acid, zinc, potassium, fiber and protein.
40.    Beans (legumes) – are an excellent source for vitamin B1, molybdenum, folate, copper, manganese, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, fiber and protein.

To learn more about essential nutrients, their role in maintaining good health and the daily intake requirements of each for child and adult, visit the article Essential Nutrients and Beneficial Foods here.

Article written by: J. Marshall

References
•    The World’s Healthiest Foods / The World’s Healthiest Foods: http://www.whfoods.com/foodstoc.php
•    The World’s Healthiest Foods / Home: http://www.whfoods.com/index.php
•    Self Nutrition Data: Know what you eat: http://nutritiondata.self.com/
•    Medical News Today / The Top 10 Healthy Foods: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/245259.php
•    Prevention / 50 Healthiest Foods For Women: http://www.prevention.com/food/healthy-eating-tips/50-healthiest-foods-for-women
•    Authority Nutrition: An Evidence-based Approach / The 11 Most Nutrient Dense Foods on The Planet: https://authoritynutrition.com/11-most-nutrient-dense-foods-on-the-planet/
•    Authority Nutrition: An Evidence-based Approach / Foods Database: https://authoritynutrition.com/foods/

Buttermilk Buckwheat Pancakes with Blueberry Maple Syrup

Buttermilk Buckwheat Pancakes with Blueberry Maple Syrup

Buckwheat flour and buttermilk produce dark and flavourful pancakes; topped with fresh blueberries and a blueberry infused maple syrup.

 

Buttermilk Buckwheat Pancakes with Blueberry Maple Syrup

Ingredients                                   Makes: 7 to 8 pancakes
~Blueberry Maple Syrup~
1/2 cup maple syrup
3/4 cups fresh blueberries, divided
1/2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice, from one lemon
pinch of sea salt
~Buttermilk Buckwheat Pancakes~
1 cup buckwheat flour
1 Tbsp cane sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/5 tsp sea salt
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1 egg
1 cup buttermilk
1 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted
2 Tbsp of avocado oil ~or~ coconut oil
1/4 cup fresh blueberries (optional)

Instructions
Making the Blueberry Maple Syrup. Combine the maple syrup, half of the blueberries and the lemon juice in a small sauce pan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, then reduce the heat to medium-low and boil for about 8-10 minutes. Remove the blueberry maple syrup from heat source to cool. Let the syrup cool to lukewarm, then stir in the remaining blueberries and set aside.

Make the Blueberry Buttermilk Pancakes. Combine the buckwheat flour, cane sugar, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and sea salt in a medium-large bowl and mix well.

Beat the egg in another medium-sized bowl, then whisk in the buttermilk and melted butter.

Pour the buttermilk mixture into the dry ingredients and stir until all of the dry ingredients are moistened. Avoid over-mixing the batter, it should be a little lumpy. Note that the batter will be thick and as it sits it will create air bubbles, and that is ok.

Cook the Pancakes. Heat a nonstick pan over medium heat and add a tablespoon of cooking oil. Drop the batter from a large spoon (about 1/4 cup) and place 6 to 8 blueberries on each pancake (optional). Place blueberries away from each other and use no more than 8 otherwise it may compromise the pancake.

Cook pancakes for a couple minutes or when the pancake begins to bubble around the edges and the cooked side is golden brown. Flip the pancakes and cook for about 30 seconds to a minute longer or until the other side is also golden brown. Transfer cooked pancakes to a clean platter and cover with a clean dish towel to keep warm. When the pancakes are all cooked, serve immediately topped with some of the blueberry maple syrup. Enjoy.

Recipe shared by: J. Marshall

Visit our:

  • Article Archive – View our reference articles on maintaining a well-balanced diet, the nutritional value of essential nutrients, nutrient-rich foods and the beneficial foods that can help in the healing of chronic disease and illness.
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Spinach and Mint Salad with Strawberries and Feta

Spinach and Mint Salad with Strawberries and Feta

 

Fresh mint leaves and chopped parsley give this salad a wonderful aroma and flavour; while the sliced strawberries add a nice colour and sweetness. The crumbled feta and a balsamic vinaigrette dressing add a finishing touch to this very addictive and delicious salad.

Spinach and Mint Salad with Strawberries and Feta

Ingredients                                Makes: 4 servings
3 cups baby spinach
1 cup packed mint leaves, separated
1/4 c fresh parsley and basil, chopped
1/2 cup quartered strawberries
3 oz. goat cheese or feta cheese, crumble
~dressing~
1/4 cup balsamic vinaigrette     *see Balsamic VInaigrette Recipe

Instructions
Combine salad ingredients. In a large salad bowl add the spinach, mixed herbs, and strawberries; then gently toss to combine.

Toss salad. Serve tossed salad with crumbled goat cheese or feta and a balsamic vinaigrette or another preferred salad dressing.

Recipe shared by: J. Marshall

Try our:

Visit our:

  • Article Archive – View our reference articles on maintaining a well-balanced diet, the nutritional value of essential nutrients, nutrient-rich foods and the beneficial foods that can help in the healing of chronic disease and illness.
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Healing Qualities of Mint

Spice Rack Remedies

Healing Qualities of Mint

Mint is a refreshing herb that offers a cool burst of sweet, peppery and menthol flavours that are enjoyable in teas, salads and desserts. Cultivated for thousands of years for its culinary and medicinal benefits, mint has long been used by many diverse cultures for its calming taste and its healing qualities. While there are around 20 different species of mint, peppermint and spearmint are amongst the most common strains used.

Mint is known for its fresh taste that can eradicate bad breath, for its soothing aroma that can reduce stress and for its relieving ability that can ease GI gastrointestinal symptoms. Mint also has one of the highest antioxidant capacities of any food making it a powerful immune-boosting, anti-aging and anti-cancer treatment. An antioxidant in mint known as rosmarinic acid has also been studied for its powerful detoxing abilities along with its antiviral, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities. The remedies mint has been linked to are substantial, and what an enjoyable herb to better your health.

The germicidal qualities mint possess contribute to good oral health by destroying harmful bacteria and by cleansing the mouth. Destroying the mouth’s stinky bacteria will also help rid the mouth of bad breath. Mints sweet menthol flavours and aroma can further leave the mouth feeling refreshed and smelling great. For these reasons, mint is commonly added to dental hygiene products.

The soothing aroma of mint can reduce stress, anxiety and depression and bring about feelings of calm. Mint’s pleasant aroma can also provide relief to respiratory disorders by clearing blockages of the nose, throat, bronchi and lungs with its cool and calming effects. It reduces inflammation and irritation bringing relief to respiratory channels resulting in reduced symptoms and severity of respiratory conditions and allergies.

Mint’s relieving effects can ease GI gastrointestinal symptoms like cramping, nausea, indigestion and inflammation. The aroma of mint encourages healthy digestion by stimulating the salivary glands and by secreting digestive enzymes. The menthol oil produced in mint can also help to bring about relief to upset stomachs as well can be used for morning sickness or as a travel aid for motion sickness.

Balms made with mint or mint oil  can also be used as a treatment to relieve symptoms of headaches and migraines. Rubbing mint oil or a balm on the forehead and into the temples can immediately reduce temperatures and inflammation associated with headaches. Mint oil rubbed into sore muscles can also bring relief to muscular pain.

Try enjoying dried mint steeped in hot water for a tea or fresh mint served in a salad. Either way can provide for a sweet and soothing way to remedy your ailments and to invigorate your day.

Article written by: J. Marshall

References
•    Mercola: Take Control of Your Health / The Power of Peppermint: 21 Health Benefits Revealed: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/10/14/peppermint-health-benefits.aspx
•    Mercola: Take Control of Your Health / Mint: Learn More About This Refreshing and Invigorating Herb: http://articles.mercola.com/herbs-spices/mint.aspx
•    Dr. Health Benefits .com / Top 22 Health Benefits of Mint Leaves: http://drhealthbenefits.com/herbal/leaves/health-benefits-of-mint-leaves
•    The World’s Healthiest Foods / Peppermint: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=102
•    Health Benefits Times .com /  Health Benefits of Mint: http://www.healthbenefitstimes.com/health-benefits-mint/
•    Medical News Today / Mint: Health Benefits, Uses and Risks; M.W.16-02-2016: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/275944.php
•    Botanical Online / Medical Properties of Mint: http://www.botanical-online.com/mint.htm
•    NCBI: US National Library of Medicine Nationals Institutes of Health / Rosmarinic acid: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12482446

Grated Beet Salad in Lemon-Ginger Dressing

Grated Beet Ginger Salad

 

Grated beet, carrot and apple are combined with freshly chopped parsley, then seasoned in a mild lemon-ginger dressing. A great accompaniment salad for a sweet and spicy Asian-style dinner.

 

Grated Beet Salad in Lemon-Ginger Dressing

Ingredients                                Makes: 6 servings
~salad mix~
1 medium beet, peeled and grated
3 medium carrots, peeled and grated
1 firm granny smith apple, peeled and grated
1/2 tbsp ginger root, minced
1/4 cup fresh parsley and/or cilantro, chopped
~dressing~
1/2 lemon or lime, juiced ~or~ 2 tbsp lemon or lime juice
1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 tbsp maple syrup ~or~ liquid honey
Few shakes of sea salt and black pepper or to taste

Instructions
In a food processor or by hand, grate the beet, carrot and apple, then put aside in a large bowl. Mince 1/2 of a tablespoon of ginger and chop 1/4 cup of parsley and then add to the large bowl and stir to combine with the grated salad mix; then set aside.

In a small bowl whisk together lemon juice, olive oil and maple syrup, then seasoning with salt and pepper to taste. Refrigerate salad until ready to serve.

Recipe shared b: J. Marshall

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Baked Side of Salmon with Fresh Herb Pesto

 

A moist side of salmon is wonderfully seasoned in a flavourful marinade and then topped with a fresh herb and garlic pesto upon serving.

 

Baked Side of Salmon with Fresh Herb Pesto

Ingredients                               Makes: 4 to 5 servings
1 wild side of salmon, fresh or thawed in the fridge
~marinade~
2 Tbsp maple syrup
1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
3 garlic cloves, minced
1/4 tsp dried thyme
1/8 tsp sea salt
Black pepper to taste
~pesto~
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/4 cup fresh parsley
2 Tbsp fresh basil
2 Tbsp fresh mint
1/4 cup pine nuts ~or~ de-shelled pistachios
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Sea salt & pepper to taste
lemon wedges (garnish)

Instructions
Preheat oven and prepare baking dish. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with a piece of aluminum foil that is long enough to fold up around the side of the salmon. About twice the width of the baking sheet. You want the length so that you can tent the side of salmon for baking.

Marinate the salmon. Sprinkle a few drops of olive oil in center of foil. Place the thawed salmon skin side down on the foil, then sprinkle it evenly with the thyme, salt and pepper and then rub the seasoning gently into the salmon.

In a small bowl combine the maple syrup, olive oil, balsamic vinegar and the minced garlic. Drizzle the marinade over the side of the salmon covering its surface with the mixture.

Prepare salmon for baking. Fold up the edges of the foil and carefully wrap the side of salmon. Seal the sides and ends of the foil but be sure to leave a bit of a pocket on the top.

Bake salmon. Bake the salmon on the baking sheet in the oven. Salmon usually takes about 4 to 5 minutes per pound to cook. The average side of salmon may take about 20 minutes.

Make the pesto. While the salmon is baking make the pesto. In a food processor combine the pesto ingredients; the garlic, the fresh parsley, basil and mint leaves, the pine nuts, olive oil and the sea salt and pepper to taste. Puree the mixture in the food processor, scraping down the sides as needed until evenly mixed.  Give the pesto a taste test and add any additional seasonings as desired. Transfer pesto to a small dish and set aside until salmon is finished baking and ready to serve.

Test Salmon for readiness. When salmon is cooked through it can be easily flaked with a fork. Carefully check the thickest part of the salmon to ensure it is ready. Remove the salmon from the oven and open up the foil to expose the fully cooked salmon.

Serve the salmon with the prepared pesto. Separate the salmon into 4 or more servings. The skin should easily come off at this time, remove the skin if desired. Add a scoop of the pesto to the top of the salmon and garnish with a lemon wedge when ready to serve.

Recipe shared by: J. Marshall

Visit our Article Archive here, to learn more about nutrition, essential nutrients and how to maintain a well-balanced diet.

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Healing Foods for Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disease that can cause brain cell death, resulting in dementia which can lead to problems with memory, thinking and behaviour. Though Alzheimer’s effects mostly elderly people, it is not a normal part of aging. Up to 5% of people diagnosed with the disease have early onset, which starts when a person is only in their 40’s and 50’s. Common symptoms of Alzheimer’s include bouts of forgetfulness or confusion that usually worsens over time. The rate of which the disease worsens varies from person to person.

The cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still mostly unknown, though through decades of research it has been identified that the buildup of toxic proteins in the brain called beta amyloids and tau can cause brain cell death which leads to Alzheimer’s. How these proteins accumulate is still unclear.

Nutrition and certain types of foods have been studied for a link to Alzheimer’s disease. These studies have identified that just as there are foods that boost memory, there are foods that can destroy it. Foods that have been negatively linked to Alzheimer’s include: mercury-contaminated foods like some fish and seafoods, sugars like high-fructose syrup, corn syrup, white sugar; foods containing saturated and trans fats, fried foods, most vegetable oils, complex carbohydrates like white refined flour, white bread and white pasta products, white refined rice, cakes, pastries, processed cheese, all processed meats, bacon, all highly processed foods (any processed foods with artificial ingredients or ingredients not found in the kitchen at home), preservatives, sulphites, nitrates, beer and microwave popcorn; have all been linked to increasing a person’s risk of developing the disease.

Just as there are many foods that can cause Alzheimer’s, there are also many delicious foods that have been found to boost memory and improve cognitive function. Studies have found that maintaining a well-balanced diet of fresh whole-foods like the Mediterranean Diet can prevent and slow down the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Foods that have been identified as especially beneficial in preventing Alzheimer’s and improving memory include foods high in Omega-3, flavonoids, antioxidants, vitamin E, magnesium, vitamin B12 and folate.

Omega-3 fatty acids have been found to increase the levels of the protein LR11 which is known to destroy the beta amyloids which cause brain cell death. Decades of research and several studies have now shown that diets high in omega-3 can reduce the progression of Alzheimer’s and could be used as a preventative method in developing the disease. Foods high in omega-3 include: flaxseed, chia seeds, pumpkin seeds, oatmeal, walnuts, yogurt, eggs and low-mercury fish like wild salmon, rainbow trout, mackerel, sardines, clams and crab.

Diets high in flavonoids have been found to reduce amyloid-beta production in the brain, which in-turn reduces the amyloid plaque that builds up and eventually destroys the brains cells. Foods high in flavonoids include fresh herbs, fruits and vegetables such as: almonds, quinoa, cocoa, parsley, basil, mint, dill, thyme, lettuce, spinach, kale, cranberries, lemon, oranges, grapefruits, apples. blueberries, bananas, strawberries, cherries, raspberries, red grapes, cantaloupe, watermelon, oranges, plums, tomatoes, beets, carrots, onion, garlic, sweet potatoes, bell peppers, celery, brussels sprouts, asparagus and celery.

Antioxidants help protect cells and DNA against damage caused by oxidants or free radicals. Free radicals can cause serious damage to the body and contribute to aging and the development of diseases like Alzheimer’s. Foods high in antioxidants include: wild blueberries, gogi berries, cranberries, blackberry, raspberry, strawberry, sweet cherry, black plum, red and black grapes, artichokes, red kidney beans, pinto beans, black beans, pecans, walnuts, hazelnuts, cocoa powder, cilantro and dark leafy greens.

In a study published in 2014 through the Journal of the American Medical Association, it was concluded that vitamin E slowed the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Since vitamin E supplements can negatively interact with some medications, it is advised vitamin e be consumed through food sources. Food sources rich in vitamin E include: sunflower seeds, almonds, hazelnuts, wheat germ, spinach, pine nuts, dark leafy greens, eggs, sardines, avocados, broccoli, kale and asparagus.

Magnesium has been reported to lower the risk of cognitive decline in a couple different studies, suggesting that maintaining healthy magnesium levels may lower the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Foods high in magnesium include: pumpkin seeds, brazil nuts, sesame seeds, cashews, sunflower seeds, wheat germ, oats, salmon, quinoa, spinach, mackerel, yogurt, black beans, navy beans and all other types of legumes.

Through a study published in Neurology, researchers in Scandinavia analyzed blood samples of a few hundred individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and found that there were consistently low levels of vitamin B12 and folate. It is suggested that maintaining a diet with healthy levels of B12 may prevent the chances of Alzheimer’s developing. Foods high in vitamin B12 include: clams, oysters, mackerel, crab, sardines, trout, salmon, scallops, cottage cheese, milk, yogurt and eggs.

Eating fresh folate-rich foods on a daily basis may lower a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s according to several studies. Folic acid may help protect the brain by allowing nerve cells to repair DNA damage. Folic acid supplements and folate-fortified foods have not shown the same results though. Fresh folate-rich foods include: leafy greens, vegetables and legumes such as: lentils, asparagus, spinach, broccoli, beets, romaine lettuce, bok choy, cauliflower, parsley, garbanzo beans, black beans, navy beans, kidney beans, green beans, papaya, brussels sprouts, cabbage, green peas, celery, squash, tomatoes and strawberries.

In recent studies, maple syrup was found to protect the brain cells against damage caused by proteins linked to the degenerative disease. At the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, a group of international scientists shared research that showed maple syrup prevented the tangling of beta amyloid proteins and protected brain cells.

Mercury has been found to cause the same brain nerve damage as the beta amyloids proteins. Research conducted by the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the University of Kentucky found that mercury poisoning caused brain damage resulting in Alzheimer’s. Mercury is most commonly introduced into the body through mercury fillings, but can also be introduced through vaccines, seafood and pollution from coal-burning power plants.

Your best fight against Alzheimers disease is by avoiding industrial pollutants, highly processed foods and artificial ingredients and through maintaining a well-balanced whole food meal plan. Plenty of fresh air and regular mental stimulation are also suggested as all healthy ways to exercise, protect and nurture a healthy brain and a strong mind.

Written by: J. Marshall

References
•    Alzheimer’s and Dementia Caregiver Center / Food, Eating and Alzheimer’s: https://www.alz.org/care/alzheimers-food-eating.asp
•    Alzheimer’s Association / Adopt a Healthy Diet: http://www.alz.org/brain-health/adopt_healthy_diet.asp
•    Alzheimers.net / Nutrition and Dementia: Foods that may induce memory loss & increase Alzheimers: http://www.alzheimers.net/2014-01-02/foods-that-induce-memory-loss/
•    Alzheimers.net / Alzheimer’s Could be prevented by Maple Syrup Researchers Say: http://www.alzheimers.net/5-02-16-alzheimers-prevented-by-maple-syrup/
•    Alzheimer’s Society / Mediterranean Diet: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/info/20010/risk_factors_and_prevention/149/mediterranean_diet
•    National Institute on Aging / Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral Center / The search for Alzheimer’s Prevention Strategies: https://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/preventing-alzheimers-disease/search-alzheimers-prevention-strategies
•    Alzheimers.net / Memory Boosting Superfoods That Fight Alzheimers: http://www.alzheimers.net/2013-10-15/superfoods-that-fight-alzheimers/
•    Prevention.com / health / This Diest Change Could Save You From Alzheimers: http://www.prevention.com/health/how-diet-impacts-alzheimers-risk
•    HelpGuid.org / Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease: https://www.helpguide.org/articles/alzheimers-dementia/alzheimers-and-dementia-prevention.htm
•    Dr. Axe: Food is Medicine / Dementia & Diet Matter: These Foods Raise Alzheimer’s Risk: https://draxe.com/foods-raise-alzheimers-risk/
•    Dr. Axe: Food is Medicine /  7 Ways To Lower Dementia Risk: https://draxe.com/dementia/
•    Food for the Brain: Championing Optimum Nutrition for the Mind / About Dementia/Alzheimer’s Disease: http://www.foodforthebrain.org/nutrition-solutions/dementia-and-alzheimer%E2%80%99s-disease/about-dementiaalzheimer%E2%80%99s-disease.aspx
•    Alzheimers Australia Dementia Research Foundation / The MIND diet: another approach to dementia risk reduction: https://www.dementiaresearchfoundation.org.au/blog/mind-diet-another-approach-dementia-risk-reduction
•    Science-Based Medicine / Vitamin E for Alzheimer’s: https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/vitamin-e-for-alzheimers/

Muscle-Mix Granola

 

 

Home-made granola is easy to make and can be stored in the fridge until ready to use. Enjoy granola with fresh fruit and yogurt or almond milk for a nutrient-rich energy-boosting and muscle-building start to your day.

 

 

Muscle-Mix Granola

Ingredients                            Makes: 6 servings
~cereal mix~
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup raw pumpkin seeds
1/4 cup raw sunflower seeds
1/4 cup broken walnuts ~or~ pecans
1/4 cup almonds, slivered
1/4 cup shredded unsweetened coconut
1/4 cup cranberries, dried ~or~ raisons
4 apricots ~or~ dried figs, chopped into small pieces
2 tbsp chia seeds
2 tbsp flax seeds
2 tbsp oat bran ~or~ wheat germ
~dressing~
2 tbsps maple syrup ~or~ liquid honey
1 tbsp avocado oil ~or~ coconut oil
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp salt

Instructions
Preheat oven to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C).

Combine the cereal mix into a large bowl, and stir to evenly combine.

Add the dressing ingredients in a large bowl which includes the maple syrup, avocado oil, cinnamon and sea salt and whisk until smooth.

Add the combined cereal mix to the whisked dressing ingredients and stir until mixture is coated evenly.

Cover a baking sheet with tin foil and then pour on the seasoned cereal mix and distribute in a thin even layer.

Bake in the preheated oven for about 15-20 minutes, then remove from oven and allow mixture to cool. When mixture has cooled, store in an airtight container until ready to use.

Recipe shared by: J. Marshall

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Chocolate Chia Pudding

Chocolate Chia Pudding

 

 

A smooth chocolate pudding with a hint of cinnamon made with healthy ingredients like cocoa powder, almond milk, chia seeds and sweetened with Canadian maple syrup and some dates.

 

Chocolate Chia Pudding

Ingredients                          Makes: 4 servings
6 tbsp cocoa powder
1 tsp cinnamon, ground
couple shakes of sea salt
3 cups unsweetened almond milk   *see our almond milk recipe below
1/3 cup maple syrup
1/2 cup chia seeds
1/2 tsp vanilla extract (optional)
9 dates blended

Instructions
In a small bowl, sift together cocoa, cinnamon and sea salt, then set aside. In a medium-sized bowl, combine only 1/2 cup of the almond milk and 1/3 cup of the maple syrup. When the maple syrup and the almond milk are well mixed, then slowly whisk in the sifted dry ingredients. When the dry ingredients are evenly whisked in, whisk in the remaining almond milk until well combined. Stir in the vanilla extract into mixed ingredients and then stir in the chia seeds.

Place pudding mixture in the refrigerator covered, for about 3 hours or until the chia seeds turn jelly-like and the mixture thickens. Stir ingredients periodically.

In a food processor or blender add the dates and blend until they break down and form a ball. Scrape down sides of processor and re-mix if needed until dates are well blended. Break apart dates with hands into smaller pieces in the processor.

When chocolate chia mixture has achieved a pudding-like consistency, transfer pudding to food processor or blender with the dates. Blend mixture until completely smooth, scraping sides down of sticky dates if needed. Taste-test pudding and add additional sweetener if desired.

Transfer pudding to a sealable container and refrigerate for an hour before serving. Serve pudding chilled with desired toppings such as fruit, granola or whipped cream. Pudding keeps well in the fridge for a few days. Enjoy.

Recipe shared by: J. Marshall

*Try our How-To-Make Almond Milk recipe here!

Visit our Article Archive here, to learn more about nutrition, essential nutrients and how to maintain a well-balanced diet.

Visit our Recipe Archive here, for more delicious recipes.

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